How Creating Content for Your Business Builds Authority

Buyers today are presented with more choices, more information, and more power than ever before in history.  

Imagine you are a business owner shopping for workers compensation insurance between two agents.  The first agent has a contact page on their company website, and the other agent has produced blog posts, white papers, and conducted webinars demonstrating authority on workers compensation.

Which one do you choose?  

The answer is obvious.  However, for many sales professionals, creating establishing themselves as an authority by providing content still seems like a crazy idea.

Educational content attracts new prospects and opportunities for your business. Sure, up front it takes hard work and creativity, but it also makes the sales process much easy long-term.

As a sales professional, you understand the needs, wants, frustrations, and desires of your prospects and clients better than anyone else.  It’s up to you to share this knowledge so you can serve more people.

In John Jantsch’s book, Duct Tape Selling, he describes 6 things that creating valuable content will do for your business.

  • Content is an expectation
  • Content creates awareness
  • Content builds trust
  • Content provides proof
  • Content serves
  • Content is a referral tool

All of these are 100% accurate and in my 5 years of a creating content, I can provide a specific examples of how this works.

As an insurance agent in 2013, I focused a great deal of my time and energy into helping business owners with cyber liability coverage to protect their company from data breaches and other cyber losses.  This type of insurance and information was still very new and confusing to most business owners.

Those business owners who wanted to learn more expected to find content that could be utilized as a resource on this subject.

To help educate and provide insight, I published series of blog posts on various aspects of cyber liability issues. Prior to creating content online, I had mentioned the need for cyber liability to various prospects and customers, but with no authority.  In a period of a few months, my content began to create awareness.

While not always the most exciting or uplifting information, the content I provided built a huge amount of trust with prospects and current customers that were curious about this specific insurance coverage.

There were also situations where a prospect or client received misinformation about a cyber related insurance issue. Because this was still a new coverage, some agents did not have all the facts right.  When you create content to share online, you must do your homework.  Not only does this advance your learning curve, but creating content provides proof that you know what you are talking about.  

I had one particular client of mine who was curious about the various aspects of cyber liability and data breach.  We set up an appointment to go over questions and I also sent them a follow-up with information on cyber risk management ideas.  This type of content serves your customers by answering common problems and frustrations.

When someone had a question or concern, I could point them to my blog to address their many questions. This helped to establish me as a resource an authority in this space.

One of the best functions of creating helpful content for your market is the ability for others to share your information instantly.  Referrals are a fabulous way to grow your business, but it often be difficult for someone else to highlight your work.  Having available content is a powerful referral tool.  

Referral sources like current customers and centers of influence can share not only your name, but your authority instantaneously through the power of the internet.

The Bottom Line

The decision to step up to the plate and create content to serve your audience and build your authority is 100% up to you.

The bad news is that most of you won’t do it.

The good news is that those who do can take advantage of the fact that most won’t.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.